Get On Target
This is the show where you get to find out all about The Hub's Gun Shop and Gun Range. Hosted by Rob "Birdman" Hephner and Bruce Owen

This Episode Bruce and Birdman take a look at the newest sub-compact carry gun the Ruger LCP II, while Bruce feels they may have done too much with this gun, Birdman thinks it might be just right.

Take a look at the YouTube version of this episode @ https://youtu.be/1RIDTOK_-Y8

 

From http://www.ruger.com/products/lcpII/models.html

BEST-IN-CLASS LIGHTWEIGHT COMPACT PISTOL

  • Short, crisp, single-action trigger pull.

  • Compact at just 5.17" long and 3.71"tall, the LCP® II is designed to fit a variety of holsters and provide concealed carry options.

  • Rugged construction with through-hardened steel slide and black, one-piece, high-performance, glass-filled nylon grip frame.

  • Textured grip frame provides a secure and comfortable grip. Larger grip frame surface provides better distribution of recoil forces.

  • Includes finger grip extension floorplate that can be added to the magazine for comfort and grip.

  • Improved sights for superior visibility. Fixed front and rear sights are integral to the slide, while the hammer is recessed within the slide.

  • Easy-to-rack slide designed to hold open after last round ejection.

  • Blued, alloy steel barrel.

  • Also includes a pocket holster and one 6-round magazine.

  • Note: Six-round LCP® magazines are compatible with the LCP® II, but will not activate the last round hold-open feature of the LCP® II. Seven-round LCP® magazines are NOT compatible with the LCP® II.

 

Direct download: 123016_GOT_Final.mp3
Category:Point of the Gun -- posted at: 9:00am MST

This Episode Bruce shows off a Classic to Birdman, with a twist, the "New" Ruger Blackhawk. They also answer a couple questions from the online audience.

Listen here or watch below at the links YouTube Episode.

Video - https://youtu.be/tCP6PU3NAL4

 

http://www.ruger-firearms.com/products/newModelBlackhawkBlued/models.html

Traditional western-style, hand-filling grip has long been acknowledged as one of the most comfortable and natural pointing of any grip style.
Target-grade accuracy with ramp front and adjustable rear sights.
Patented transfer bar mechanism and loading gate interlock provide an unparalleled measure of security against accidental discharge.
Variety of caliber, barrel length, grips, finish and weight guarantees a model to meet the needs of today's single-action shooters.
Cold hammer-forged barrel results in ultra-precise rifling that provides exceptional accuracy, longevity and easy cleaning.

Direct download: 122316_GOT_Final.mp3
Category:Point of the USED Gun -- posted at: 1:00pm MST

This Episode Bruce and Birdman cover another very cool gun, the Henry Survival 22. If you want to see this Episode the entire thing, including photos of the gun and the range video can be found on YouTube at the link below.

 

Video - https://youtu.be/OTiAkiyo4Mg

Be sure to subscribe and you'll catch all the new shows.

https://www.henryrifles.com/rifles/u-s-survival-ar-7/ 

Since 1959 the venerable AR-7 has been the choice of U.S. Air Force pilots who need a small-caliber rifle they can count on should they have to punch out over a remote area. Through the years the AR-7’s reputation for portability, ease of operation and reliability has carried over to the civilian world. Today it’s a favorite of bush pilots, backpackers and backcountry adventurers who, like their Air Force counterparts, need a rifle that’s easy to carry yet has the accuracy to reliably take down small game.

Like the original Henry U.S. Survival Rifle, this innovative, semi-automatic model is lightweight (3.5 lbs.) and highly portable. At just 16.5″ long, when all the components are stowed, it easily fits into the cargo area of a plane, boat or in a backpack. It’s chambered in .22 LR so you can carry a large quantity of ammunition without adding much weight to your gear.

When disassembled the pieces fit inside the impact-resistant, water resistant stock. Assembly is as easy as attaching the receiver to the stock, inserting the barrel, and screwing on the nut. In a few seconds, without any tools, the Henry U.S. Survival AR-7 is ready for action. It comes standard with a sturdy steel barrel covered in tough ABS plastic with a protective coating for complete corrosion resistance. It’s engineered for perfect balance and the ability to maintain its tack-driving accuracy, even after thousands of rounds.

The receiver has a protective coating that provides superior weatherproofing and waterproof protection, even in harsh saltwater environments. The updated receiver is grooved, making it easy to top off with your favorite optics.

The Henry U.S. Survival AR-7 is available in two finishes; Black and Mossy Oak Break-Up Camo Pattern.  All models are equipped with an adjustable rear sight and a blade front sight.

 

Direct download: 121616_GOT_Final.mp3
Category:Point of the USED Gun -- posted at: 1:00pm MST

This Episode Bruce and Birdman chat about the 75th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor and honor those who served by talking about a very special weapon know as the M1 Carbine.

This is the first full Video Episode of the Get on Target @ The Hub Podcast that you can check out on YouTube.

https://youtu.be/wMCk1-1Wcm0

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The M1 carbine (formally the United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1) is a lightweight, easy to use,[2] .30 caliber semi-automatic carbine that was a standard firearm for the U.S. military during World War II, the Korean War and well into the Vietnam War. The M1 carbine was produced in several variants and was widely used by not only the U.S. military, but by military, paramilitary and police forces around the world. It has also been a popular civilian firearm.

The M2 carbine is the selective-fire version of the M1 carbine capable of firing in both semi-automatic and full-automatic. The M3 carbine was an M2 carbine with an active infrared scope system.[3]

Despite its name and similar appearance, the M1 carbine is not a shorter version of the M1 Garand rifle. It is a completely different firearm and it fires a different type of ammunition. It was simply called a carbine because it is smaller and lighter than the Garand.

On July 1, 1925, the U.S. Army began using the current naming system where the "M" is the designation for Model and the "number" represents the sequential development of equipment and weapons.[4] Therefore, the "M1 rifle" was the first rifle developed under this system. The "M1 carbine" was the first carbine developed under this system. The "M2 carbine" was the second carbine developed under the system, etc.

 

Direct download: 120716_GOT_Final.mp3
Category:Point of the USED Gun -- posted at: 10:00am MST

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